Importance of Education

The education  is very important  to every individual all over the world. The basic of an education lies in the bottom line of the culture, discipline and the well being of the human beings.

Education is the vital key to open the inbuilt talents of a person. So, it is very essential to focus more on the childhood education as it can do wonders. You can be amazed of this fact.

The strong basement of education to the children is very essential to lead their life in a better, self-discipline and a prosperous way. The education can mold them in a better way to survive wherever they are and whatever they do. The educational gaps should be avoided. It is a damn truth that the education gives a better identity to the solemn individuals..

The basic of education starts with the “SCHOOL SLATE” and a “SLATE PENCIL” and now it reaches the mass spectrum in the name of “INTERNET”. Every educated person in India is supposed to meet the two extremes. As we don’t wanna roll back, let’s keep an eye on the emerging trends in the “INTERNET” in education.

 

Page Private School
657 Victoria St
Costa Mesa, California 92627
949-515-1700
http://pageschool.com/

Advertisements

How To Make The Most of Studying in the USA

 

1. Prepare for your first few days in the U.S. before you leave

2. Attend orientation – you will receive valuable guidance, course advising, and help with registration

3. Develop an education plan: include your goals and the steps necessary to achieve them, then consult with an advisor

4. Participate in class and study to get the most from your education

5. Get involved and experience the culture!

 

Page Private School
657 Victoria St
Costa Mesa, California 92627
949-515-1700
http://pageschool.com/

Supporting Your Child in Middle School Math

math problem

As parents, we sometimes forget how confusing, frustrating and difficult middle school can be, and for some kids, math is especially confusing, frustrating and difficult. Being a middle school math teacher, I hear from many parents who want to help their children but aren’t sure how. Whether you identify with the Carla*, a mother who helps her son too much because she’s eager for him to get good grades or Todd*, a dad who doesn’t know how to help to his daughter because he “doesn’t understand the math” himself, every parent can benefit from these tips for supporting children who struggle with middle school math.

Before you can help your child, it’s important to understand what is happening (mathematically) to the adolescent brain. Middle school is an exciting time; adolescents’ brains are transitioning from reasoning in a concrete manner to understanding abstract concepts and ideas. According to the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, middle school math typically begins with concepts such as fractions and decimals, and by the time students’ move on to high school, they have learned pre-algebra concepts, such as manipulating variables and solving or writing equations to find unknown values—ideas that cannot easily be visualized or explained with physical objects. Keep in mind that this is particularly hard for students stuck in a concrete state of mind; they tend to rely on memorizing steps or procedures to solve problems, which can lead to more difficulties later on.

Here are some useful tips on how you can support your child in math:
Always have notes from class, a textbook or other resources right next to a homework paper. If your child gets stuck, she is likely to find a similar problem in one of these resources that can help her move forward.
Ensure the student takes responsibility for her own learning by finding assistance independently; the ability to access help on your own is essential for student success in all areas of academics.
Never give children the answers to problems! By giving away answers, you’re depriving your child of the chance to develop the mental processes required to learn a new concept. No parent enjoys seeing their child struggle, but providing answers could set them up for frustration when they have to tackle more difficult problems and might even stunt their progress as classmates move to more advanced lessons. Furthermore, your child’s teacher will not be able to address the misconceptions or areas of weakness that should be targeted in school if homework assignments do not reflect the student’s level of understanding.
Encourage your child to underline or highlight key words or phrases in situational problems, as these often help students set up a solution.
Realize that your child may struggle with abstract concepts if his or her brain is not quite ready to reason at an abstract level. Your child’s brain will mature in time, and success in math class is likely to accompany this development.
If your child is frustrated by mathematics, show him how to focus on concepts rather than procedural knowledge. This might help some students approach and solve problems in a different way—one that makes more sense to them. For instance, ask your child to explain one problem in their assignment each night. If possible, choose one that incorporates both words and computation.

 

Page Private School

657 Victoria St.

Costa Mesa, California 92627

949-515-1700

pageschool.com

Instill a Love of Math

Family playing checkers

Parents are bombarded with messages to read with their children, but it’s rare to hear about the importance of doing math with them. Here are some helpful tips on why and how to instill a love of math in your children.

Early Math Matters
We may take for granted that our children will inevitably learn how to add, subtract, multiply and divide, but early math lessons establish the base for the rest of their thinking lives. “Mathematics that kids are doing in kindergarten, first, second and third grades lays the foundation for the work they are going to do beyond that,” says Linda Gojak, president of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM). “They are learning beyond just counting and numbers.” That’s why it’s so important to help children love math while they are still young. Parents can build on those first preschool lessons by counting with their children, asking them to look for patterns and recognize shapes, then moving on to numbers, Gojak says.

The goal should be to make math “real” and meaningful by pointing it out in the world around you. That could include checking and comparing prices at the grocery store, driving down the street counting mailboxes, reading recipes, calculating coupons, or even measuring food or drink at the dinner table. Kevin Mahoney, math curriculum coordinator at Pennacre Country Day School in Wellesley, Mass., says when his children were little, his wife kept a small measuring tape in her pocketbook. While they were waiting for their order at a restaurant, the children would measure different items on the table.

Just as you encourage your early reader to look for familiar letters, ask your child to watch for math, regarding math as highly as you do reading. “Every parent knows that it’s a good idea to read to your child every night, but they should also realize the importance of talking about mathematical situations with children every day,” says Mahoney.

Page Private School

657 Victoria St.

Costa Mesa, California 92627

949-515-1700

pageschool.com

Kindergartner Reading Milestones

By the end of kindergarten, most children can recognize and write upper and lower case letters. They also learn the sounds associated with most of the letters of the alphabet. Most kindergartners can tell you that B says “b” and M says “m” and can incorporate letters and sounds into games they play like “The Name Game” and “I Spy.” Children typically master consonant sounds before vowel sounds because it is harder to hear the small differences among some vowel sounds.

Most kindergartners can read some words and simple books. Children in kindergarten recognize some words by sight or by looking at them and recognizing them as wholes. Kindergartners’ “sight words” often include their own names, the names of classmates, and words they use frequently in their writing, such as “Mom,” “love, ” and “the.” They also learn words they see around them, such as “STOP” and “EXIT.” Many can read “families” of words such as “cat,” “bat,” and “mat.” By the end of the year, many kindergartners are able to “read” familiar books by recognizing a few words, remembering what the story says, and looking at the picture.

Kindergartners learn that writing goes from left to right. They learn that we read to the end of a line and return to the left to read another line. They learn where a printed word begins and ends and learn the difference between a word and a letter. Many can match spoken words to the words in books. They even begin to recognize and learn the purpose of common punctuation marks such as periods and question marks. Having a solid understanding of what print is and the way it works is necessary for learning to read.

Kindergartners can understand more than just the plot of a story. They are able to extend their thinking and discuss why events happened and why characters acted as they did. They can also make reasonable predictions about what will happen next and relate the story events to events in their own lives. Being able to discuss stories they listen to now will help children make meaning later on when they are able to read independently.


Encouraging Your Kindergartner

  • Let your child read the words and offer help only when it’s needed. By the end of kindergarten, many children can read simple books containing short, common words and books that follow a predictable pattern. Most children rely heavily on pictures and their memory of the story to help them read. Young readers benefit from practice, and they take great pride in showing off their new skills to adults. As your child reads to you, you can help out and provide words if he gets stuck, but try not to step in before you are needed.
  • Let your child “share” the reading with you. Not all children can read books independently at the end of kindergarten, but all can share reading with an adult. The child who recognizes only a few words can chime in and read those words in the text. Most can fill in a rhyming word in a shared reading. For example, if you read, “Have you ever seen a bear combing his _______?” your child will probably provide “hair” as the correct rhyme.
  • Keep reading sessions short. Reading can be hard work for kindergartners. It is a complex activity that requires a delicate orchestration of skills, including paying attention, looking carefully at print, remembering sounds of letters, and using language prediction skills. Kindergartners expend a lot of energy reading, so if your child shows signs of frustration, it is definitely time to stop.
  • Encourage your child to track the print with a finger, pointing to each word as she says it. This habit will reinforce the idea that printed words represent spoken words and that print goes from left to right in English. You can also ask your child to find words she knows in the text or to find a word that starts with a certain beginning sound. Asking your child how she knew the word was “kitten” and not “cat,” for example, will help improve her awareness of the strategies she is beginning to use in reading.
  • Don’t limit reading to books. Reading is a skill that we use regularly in our everyday lives, so encourage your child to read at times other than at book time. Having your kindergartner read street signs, look over your shopping list, follow a simple recipe with you, and read a menu with you are all ways that you can extend reading beyond books.

Page Private School

657 Victoria St.

Costa Mesa, California 92627

949-515-1700

pageschool.com